Frog Blog (and more)

Easter Lilies

Easter Lilies

I was in my kitchen the other day here in north Florida and heard cries coming from out back, just yards away. I thought maybe it was a cat, or maybe a bird, clearly in distress. The cries were quite loud so I went outside my screen porch and looked up for the source of the sound and there was a frog, of all things, right where the roof of the porch meets the house. I gently pushed the mop end of a string mop up there so he could hop onto it but he didn’t. So I got out the ladder and it appeared his leg was stuck in the space and I tried tugging him out. It was stuck pretty hard and I sure didn’t want to pull his leg off but I tried again and pulled out a small snake who had the frog’s leg in its mouth! Wow…what a surprise! The snake actually appeared too small to swallow a frog this big (about 2″)and then it let go of its grip. So the frog was spared and I put him on the ground. No idea what became of Froggie after that but his calls for help worked.

Now on to the “More” part of this post…..a very serious matter: MRSA, or the antibiotic resistant Staphylococcus aureus…the worst kind of staph infection. I have had some nasty staph infections myself (and even blogged about them)so when I read an article in the Feb 2015 issue of Prevention magazine called “The Natural Superbug Cure No One is Telling You About”, I paid attention. The quote under the title goes on to say: “Deadly antibiotic-resistant infections have American doctors trembling. Thanks to a therapy long forgotten here, one country in Eastern Europe is having no such crisis. So why are thousands of us dying?” (by Koren Wetmore)  The article describes a 51 year old single mom from Fort Worth, Texas, named Laura Roberts, who clearly saw Death moving in closer and closer. She had had seasonal swelling of her nasal passages for years and had relied on antibiotics to fight the infections. However, in the 7 years since she got the infamous methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, the MRSA spread from her sinuses to her ears, lungs and stomach. Eventually there wasn’t an antibiotic left that could help her. Her body was ravaged and depleted of all strength. She was in pain and couldn’t hold down food. The doctors had given her 3 months to live, at most.   Then from TV, she learned about the Phage Therapy Center in Tbilisi, Georgia (Russia) that used “bacteriophage therapy” to kill infections. Apparently, phages dwell in water, soil, and even the human digestive tract, wherever bacteria are found because they rely on them to reproduce. They are viruses that kill only specific bacteria, “bad” ones, and leave the good. They are commonly used in Poland and Russia whenever antibiotics fail.  Her brother accompanied Laura on the long trip to Georgia where she limped along with a walker. After 3 weeks of treatment, she was completely healed. Phages had completely cured the infection, which involved 3 different MRSA strains.        Needless, to say, this treatment needs to be available in the US, where over 20,000 people a YEAR die from such infections!  Apparently, the US Army Medical Research & Materiel (their spelling)Command is working on it, specifically,  a microbiologist named Cliff Snyder,who is also working with his team at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and the pharmaceutical company AmpliPhi Biosciences to get phage therapies through the multiple stages of testing and approval required in the US.  Anyhow, there is enough information here to get someone started on a Google search if you need this. I find it such revolutionary, life-saving information that I had to post this. It could take years and years before it is approved here, ridiculous as that seems, but if worse comes to worse, literally, one can find one’s way to Russia.

That’s all for today.  I intend to start posting more of my drawings and paintings with little descriptions. Better than having them just sitting in sketch books and folders for nobody to see.

Grateful Frog

Grateful Frog

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